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Air quality charts for Ayala Avenue and UST Espana showing unusual pollution spikes from December 31, 2016. Source: Airtoday.ph

RC Makati’s air quality charts capture images of New Year’s unusual pollution spikes

Each year, dazzling fireworks that paint the night sky highlight the New Year’s revelry, but cloud people’s awareness of an ugly aftermath: Dangerous air pollution spikes.

On December 31st 2016, the Rotary Club of Makati’s air quality monitoring system (AQMS) captured dramatic images in real-time of unusual air pollution spikes from 12 midnight of December 31, 2016 to 4:00 AM of January 1, 2017.

Using a GRIMM EDM365 environmental dust point monitoring machine acquired from Germany, RC Makati’s AQMS records and reports air pollution data from four strategic locations that bracket Metro Manila: Ayala Avenue Makati, UST Espana, EDSA Munoz, and Lung Center of the Philippines.

It features real-time 24/7 recording of PM10 and PM2.5, in micrograms per cubic meter, and .on-line reporting as colored index via the website and mobile app Airtoday.ph, with corresponding precautionary advice when air pollution reaches unhealthy levels.

RC Makati’s air quality charts showed that air pollution in Metro Manila started reaching “poor” alert levels as early as 11:00 PM December 31, 2016 and spiked to “very poor” and “hazardous” levels from 12 midnight until 4:00 AM January 1, 2017.

UST Espana recorded the highest pollution levels with PM2.5 level spiking to 212 micrograms per cubic meter air (ug/m3). This exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) safe standard of 25 ug/m3   over a 24-hour mean by up to eight times.

PM10 level reached 264 ug/m — five times over WHO safe standard of 50 ug/m3    over a 24-hour mean.New Year Chart

Short-lived relief

RC Makati’s Airtoday.ph charts showed that air quality changed to moderate from around 7:00 AM January 1, 2017 and only improved to “good” at around 10:00 AM.

After the air cleared from the New Year’s fireworks, Metro Manila enjoyed “good” to “very good” air quality from around 10 AM January 1, 2017 to about 3 AM January 3, 2017 which was ideal for enjoying usual outdoor activities.

But this was a short-lived relief. Air quality decreased to “moderate” around 4 AM of January 3, 2017.

Dr. Mylene G. Cayetano, Ph.D. of the UP Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology who leads the interpretation of scientific data for RC Makati’s AQMS, said that the spike came vehicular traffic when work and classes resumed on January 3.

Because of this, Cayetano emphasized the importance of RC Makati’s real-time air monitoring system that enables the public to access air pollution data 24/7 so they can protect themselves from health hazards linked to air pollution before heading out — whenever there is a pollution event such as the New Year’s fireworks or from daily exposure to tail-pipe pollution from the metro’s roads.

“Pollution monitoring machines, whether point monitoring or long-path systems, may have the capability to record pollution data accurately but if this data is not consistently made available to the public, then the monitoring fails to serve one of its more important purposes: To warn the public of pollution spikes in real-time,” she said.

RC Makati’s past president Eddie H. Yap, who initiated and continues to champion the AQMS project, said: “If we are vigilant about keeping safe from firecracker-related injuries during the New Year, we should also be vigilant about keeping our lungs safe from air pollution, which is killing us slowly but surely”.